Noble Bostons

Living, learning & loving Bostons, since 2003

Finding a Boston

Congratulations to you for deciding that a Boston Terrier is right for you!  Once one joins your family, you will soon realize you will never be able to be without one again!
 
Please contact us for information on puppy availability.  Please use the information below to help you in your search.
 
When choosing a breeder, it is of utmost importance to choose one who is reputable, and who is breeding for the betterment of the breed.  Putting two Boston Terriers together to make babies because they are cute is not a criteria that a responsible breeder uses when choosing parents.  Knowing the history of the line, the health clearances of the dog and bitch and those in their pedigrees, as well as understanding what faults each has, and what each needs from the other to improve upon those faults, is just the tip of the iceberg.  Breeding to the Boston Terrier Standard, established in the infancy of the Boston Terrier breed by the Boston Terrier Club of America, and approved by the AKC, is what responsible breeders do...to ensure they are producing Boston Terrier who LOOK and ACT like Boston Terriers were intended! 
 
Remember that Boston Terriers have small litters, and most breeders won't necessarily have puppies available NOW.  Good breeders usually have waiting lists.  Don't let this discourage you!  Finding the right Boston for you, the right family member to be happy and healthy for many years with you, isn't something you can necessarily count on finding tomorrow.  If you have to wait, I promise, it will be WELL worth it! 
 
Also, please consider rescue.  Sadly, rescue groups always have dogs available.  They might have puppies and will likely have young adults, just waiting for their perfect home.  Our Jenny came to us through Boston Terrier Club of MD Rescue and is the miracle of our lives.  We wanted an adult at the time, so as not to have to deal with potty training, leash training, crate training, and general puppy destruction.  Plus, it made us feel good to give a home to a pup so in need of one, and ready to give so much love.  And, by getting an adult, you are assured as to what size your dog will be.  If you have a general size in mind, remember that it can be very difficult to predict the size puppies will grow into, so by getting an adult, you get that information right off the bat.  You can find links to Boston Terrier rescue groups on our Links page.
 
To start your search, use the Breeder Referral Search Engine on the BTCA web site or request the Breeder Referral list from the BTCA.  Be sure to request several states....this will give you the best chance to find a puppy.   Boston Terrier Club of America Breeder Referral
 
Just because a breeder is on the BTCA Breeder Referral list doesn't necessarily mean they are reputable.  You can read about the Boston Terrier Club of America's take on reputable breeders on their web site BTCA Reputable Breeder info 
 
Another great reference about reputable breeders and to learn about the health issues that Bostons face is  Puppy Buyer's Guide put together by Widget Bostons.  Do not work with a breeder who doesn't health test their breeding stock.  Remember, a 'vet check' is not the same as health testing.  There are 4 primary tests that you want to know the breeder has performed on the parents of the puppies.  Baer test (to test for unliateral or bilateral hearling, done once in a dog's lifetime, after 8 weeks of age, by a Baer technician with special equipment,) CERF eye exam (to test for juvenile cataracts or other eye problems, done annually for the life of the dog, with the first test coming any time after 8 weeks of age, by a veterinary ophthalmologist,) Juvenile Cataract DNA test (to learn if the dog is clear, a carrier, or affected by this gene) and OFA patellas (to check the knees for luxating patellas.  This can't be done until age 1 year, and can be repeated annually, and can be done by an orthopedist or by a regular vet.)  Many reputable breeders register their test results on the OFA site, and making this information available to the public will help breeders and Boston enthusiasts for decades to come.
  
 A great place for a lot of Boston Terrier info....facts and fun....is The Woofboard, A Boston Terrier Board.  Breeder referrals are only allowed via Private Message there, but you can read a lot about Bostons, find links to rescue groups, and learn more about how to find a reputable breeder.
 
Another fantastic web site is  Brindle Hill Boston Terriers.  Brindle Hill has tons of helpful info on their site, including some great information about feeding your Boston.  
 
Another great way to find good breeders is to attend dog shows.  There you can talk to breeders and see the style of dogs they are producing.  There is no substitution to working with a show breeder....they are breeding to better the breed, and breeding to the Standard, which is what you want to ensure the proper development of the breed in the future.  You can find out about upcoming shows in your area on Infodog.
 
Remember, we all want our new dog NOW, once we have finally decided we are ready to add one to our family.  And I can understand how tempting a pet shop puppy can be...there, ready to come home now, etc. DO NOT go this route.  Pet shop puppies come from puppy mills and puppy brokers....people who own dogs for the express purpose of having puppies to make money.  There, dogs live in horrid conditions, in cages their entire lives, just to make babies.  When they can't reproduce anymore, they are dumped.  DO NOT support these horrible people by buying a puppy from a pet shop.  If you buy one, it leave room at the shop for another one to come in, and thus supports what these terrible mills are doing.  Waiting for a happy, healthy loving Boston from a wonderful home to your wonderful home will be a decision you will NEVER regret.
 
And remember, if you will consider an older puppy, young adult, or rescue of any age, your options may be greatly opened up to you...and the love of your life will soon be at home with you, where he/she belongs.